Duties And Oath of the Medici Lategum

As is the tradition of all modern groups, every good organization has a need for medical personnel.
The Hospes Lategum is no different. Our purpose, though, is to monitor and treat The Hosts, coated each in their Lategis, and help others who wish to join by examining with the help of our own Lategum.

The Lategis, by instinctive nature, helps steer hosts away from overtly dangerous situations, and protects the Host from harsh atmospheric conditions in the performance of service. To help the Host live in harmony with the Lategis, meditation is often essential and prescribed to help the Host become more aware and in tune with their Lategis. Hospes who wish to become part of the Medici undergo a training program designed to measure their knowledge of medicine and ability to carry on duties as set in the oath here.

Duties and specific departments in the Medici Lategum

Our Staff now include the general Medici Lategum, a General Practice Medici able to fill in the many areas. They will examine the Zetas prior to the joining and provide general care to the Hospes Lategum as a whole. Also included are specialty Medici, beginning with Triage Medici, they will help in general and emergency situations where a large volume of patients are in. Counselor Medici will provide counseling and therapy services within the Medici, and Lab Medici will provide laboratory services for cutting-edge research and pharmacy services for the Medici.

All Medicus Lategis perform in accordance with the Hippocratic Oath modern version as is traditionally prescribed in modern medicine. This carries on a tradition dating back to the more traditional Hippocratic Oath of the days in our beginnings in Vesuvius.

This Oath, written in 1964 and based on the original Hippocratic Oath, which bound physicians and healers to do no harm to those they serve.

HIPPOCRATIC OATH, MODERN VERSION
I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant:

I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow.

I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures which are required, avoiding those twin traps of overtreatment and therapeutic nihilism.

I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon's knife or the chemist's drug.

I will not be ashamed to say "I know not," nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient's recovery.

I will respect the privacy of my patients, for their problems are not disclosed to me that the world may know. Most especially must I tread with care in matters of life and death. If it is given me to save a life, all thanks. But it may also be within my power to take a life; this awesome responsibility must be faced with great humbleness and awareness of my own frailty. Above all, I must not play at God.

I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person's family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick.

I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure.

I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm.

If I do not violate this oath, may I enjoy life and art, respected while I live and remembered with affection thereafter. May I always act so as to preserve the finest traditions of my calling and may I long experience the joy of healing those who seek my help.

Written in 1964 by Louis Lasagna, Academic Dean of the School of Medicine at Tufts University, and used in many medical schools today. Taken with citation from the Johns Hopkins University Libraries and Sherman Museums website.

Transcribed by β7703

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